Matt Pilieci and Clyde Baldo at Fordham's New Work Series, June 2014: Photo Credit: Dawn McDonald. 

Matt Pilieci and Clyde Baldo at Fordham's New Work Series, June 2014: Photo Credit: Dawn McDonald. 

These are some very exciting times for The Eternal Space!  

We're on the cusp of two major events in our production's history: First we'll be launching a Kickstarter campaign within the next week or so to help fund a showcase run in 2015 and second, I will be heading back to my desk to pen the ninth draft of the show's script. That's right, nine drafts with over ten years of research and development threaded into its leggy pages. To someone who can barely keep a plant alive, it boggles my mind that the script ever made it this far. And throughout the process, I've been asked:

Why would a man who's never set foot in New York's old Pennsylvania Station devote more than a decade of his life to recreating it on the stage?

That's a damn good question. Consider this the first in a weekly series of posts fleshing out the answer. 

Of course in the ten years it's taken to get here there have been a few starts and stops along the way (a lot more stopping than starting) but with our production going full-steam ahead I think it would be fun to take a look at the process from conception to full-stage production.

So I invite you along for the ride as The Eternal Space realizes one crazy guy's idea to bring one of the most majestic train stations ever to exist... and then be destroyed... back to life... on the stage.

I know, deep breaths will be required. 

 A screen cap of what's staring me in the face at the moment.

A screen cap of what's staring me in the face at the moment.